In a day when finding reading material for the young is a constant difficulty for parents, we may sometimes overlook the fact that there is some very readable and interesting material for the young (and the not so young also)  associated with the Truth

In 1890 Brother Roberts, who was then 51, felt that there was a need to commence a magazine for young readers. The magazine was entitled Good Company and was specifically designed to cover a breadth of topics of interest to those striving to bring up children in a Godly manner in the evil days of the 1890’s. We may say, if it was important then in the “Victorian Era”, how much more so today!

A series under the heading My Days and My Ways ran monthly through the magazine. Subsequently, after Brother Roberts’ death, these chapters were bound in book form by Brother C.C. Walker, Brother Roberts’ successor as Editor of the Christadelphian. Before binding the

In a day when finding reading material for the young is a constant difficulty for parents, we may sometimes overlook the fact that there is some very readable and interesting material for the young (and the not so young also)  associated with the Truth

In 1890 Brother Roberts, who was then 51, felt that there was a need to commence a magazine for young readers. The magazine was entitled Good Company and was specifically designed to cover a breadth of topics of interest to those striving to bring up children in a Godly manner in the evil days of the 1890’s. We may say, if it was important then in the “Victorian Era”, how much more so today!

A series under the heading My Days and My Ways ran monthly through the magazine. Subsequently, after Brother Roberts’ death, these chapters were bound in book form by Brother C.C. Walker, Brother Roberts’ successor as Editor of the Christadelphian. Before binding the book, Brother Walker completed the life account of Brother Roberts in a series entitled His Days and His Ways.

I can distinctly recall, as a teenager, noting in my father’s library the spine of the book My Days and My Ways – Roberts. I was aware of books such as The Law of Moses and Nazareth Revisited by Brother Roberts. The thought went through my mind, “I wonder who this ‘Roberts’ is whose book has found a place among Christadelphian writings on my father’s bookshelf”. I took it down and soon realised that it was an autobiography by Brother Roberts. Immediately I found myself mentally back in the mid 1800’s and following the life of this faithful ambassador for the Truth. Within a couple of days the book was completed but the power of his example left a lasting effect upon my life.

Such books are “good reading” for our young people. Other books which fall into this category are Robert Roberts by Islip Collyer, Diary of a Voyage to Australia and Diary of a Second Voyage to Australia, both by Brother Roberts. In these books we see how the events of everyday life can be put into the context of the Divine scheme of things. Added to the power of example and the motivation that these books can give, these brethren were competent writers who used the English language skilfully as a vehicle to descriptively and accurately set forth events and teachings. They far surpass so much of the literature that schools encourage our students to read today.

Yahweh intended reading to be the method for man to learn of His ways. Thus he caused the Bible to be written and preserved for us. Let us consistently encourage our young people to develop the art of accurate reading and then meditation on the Divine ideals set forth in His Word. And let us realise that there is such “lighter reading material” that our young people can be guided to read with profit. The benefit is twofold. It causes them to appreciate the work of faithful brethren who struggled for the Truth to be revived and established in these last days, as well as broadening their appreciation of life and living conditions in the world 100 years ago.

book, Brother Walker completed the life account of Brother Roberts in a series entitled His Days and His Ways.

I can distinctly recall, as a teenager, noting in my father’s library the spine of the book My Days and My Ways – Roberts. I was aware of books such as The Law of Moses and Nazareth Revisited by Brother Roberts. The thought went through my mind, “I wonder who this ‘Roberts’ is whose book has found a place among Christadelphian writings on my father’s bookshelf”. I took it down and soon realised that it was an autobiography by Brother Roberts. Immediately I found myself mentally back in the mid 1800’s and following the life of this faithful ambassador for the Truth. Within a couple of days the book was completed but the power of his example left a lasting effect upon my life.

Such books are “good reading” for our young people. Other books which fall into this category are Robert Roberts by Islip Collyer, Diary of a Voyage to Australia and Diary of a Second Voyage to Australia, both by Brother Roberts. In these books we see how the events of everyday life can be put into the context of the Divine scheme of things. Added to the power of example and the motivation that these books can give, these brethren were competent writers who used the English language skilfully as a vehicle to descriptively and accurately set forth events and teachings. They far surpass so much of the literature that schools encourage our students to read today.

Yahweh intended reading to be the method for man to learn of His ways. Thus he caused the Bible to be written and preserved for us. Let us consistently encourage our young people to develop the art of accurate reading and then meditation on the Divine ideals set forth in His Word. And let us realise that there is such “lighter reading material” that our young people can be guided to read with profit. The benefit is twofold. It causes them to appreciate the work of faithful brethren who struggled for the Truth to be revived and established in these last days, as well as broadening their appreciation of life and living conditions in the world 100 years ago.